Category Archives: Flood

Heavy Rains Cause Flooding

phh insurance flood insuranceWell Spring has arrived.  We will see warmer temperatures this weekend, but along with the arrival of warmer temps and spring comes rain.  This weekend in the Northeast we are expecting heavy rains Saturday into Sunday.  The National Weather Service is predicating 2 to 4 inches of rain across Southern New England, with likely a potential for flooding.

With this potential for flooding we need to make sure we are prepared.  The Travelers Insurance has some really good tips to prepare yourself and home for potential flooding issues.

 

  • Review your current homeowner’s insurance policy and become familiar with what is and is not covered, as damage due to flooding is typically not covered.
  • Inspect sump pumps and drains regularly to ensure proper operation.
  • If you own a generator, have a licensed electrician provide a transfer switch to your sump pump so you can operate it in the event of flooding.
  • To help prevent sewage backup, have a licensed plumber install an interior or exterior backflow valve.
  • Keep sandbags on hand to help divert unusually high water away from your foundation.
  • In snowy climates, flag drains to avoid plowing snow on top of them.
  • Learn the flood alert signals of your community.
  • Collect emergency building materials if you live in a frequently flooded area. These include plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, nails, shovels and sandbags.
  • Plan and practice an evacuation route. Designate a place for family members to meet in the event they become separated.
  • Review with all family members how to shut off utilities in an emergency.
  • Plan a survival kit with important documents, including insurance documents, medications and critical items in the event you need to leave your home.
  • Promptly report the loss to your insurance agent

For any further questions feel free to give one of our agents a call at Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance.

Protecting YOU is our Job

 

 

Heavy Rains Saturday Pose Flooding Risk

flooding in homeHeavy rains this weekend will have potential of causing flooding in our area on Saturday. Here is information as reported from Channel 3 meteorologist Scot Haney on the upcoming storm.

The storm will also bring a lot of rain.  We’ll have periods of rain and drizzle Saturday.  However, the heaviest rain will hold off until late Saturday and Saturday night.  Some of our computer guidance models are forecast 1.0″ to 1.5″ of rain with locally higher amounts.  The combination of heavy rain, frozen ground, and ice on the state’s streams and rivers could set us up for some flooding.  Flooding will be possible in poor drainage areas and in basements.  Plus, river flooding is possible where ice jams occur.

The cold front will be progressive and the rain will come to an end before dawn Sunday.  Sunday will without a doubt be the better of the 2 weekend days.  We can expect mostly sunny skies and a gusty northwesterly wind.  Here’s some more good news: the air moving in behind the front won’t be all that cold!  Therefore, we expect highs in the mid to upper 40s Sunday!

Here are some tips to help you prepare for potential flooding from our partners Travelers Insurance.

  • Know your flood zone risk. Evaluate your flood risk.
  • Inspect sump pumps and drains regularly to ensure proper operation.
  • Keep sandbags on hand to help divert unusually high water away from your foundation.
  • In snowy climates, flag drains to avoid plowing snow on top of them.
  • Learn the flood alert signals of your community.
  • Collect emergency building materials if you live in a frequently flooded area. These include plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, nails, shovels and sandbags.
  • Plan and practice an evacuation route. Designate a place for family members to meet in the event they become separated.
  • Review with all family members how to shut off utilities in an emergency.
  • Remove standing water as quickly as possible, including from your basement. If your basement is flooded, pump out about 1/3 of the water per day to avoid structural damage.

Remember to promptly report any loss caused by flooding to your Insurance Agent.  Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance is always here to assist you with all your claims.

Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance

Protecting YOU is our Job

 

 

 

Biggert-Waters Reform Act of 2012

flood insurance phhBiggert-Waters Reform Act of 2012

Many insured’s have been hearing about the dramatic increase in premiums on their flood policy.  We wanted to give you some information regarding the Biggert-Waters Reform Act and how it will affect flood premium rates per the National Flood Insurance Program.

Provisions of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 require the NFIP to raise insurance rates for some older properties in high-risk areas to reflect true flood risk.

The affected properties are among those built before the community joined the NFIP and adopted its first Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). Communities began joining the NFIP in the late 1960s. To find out when your community joined, contact your local floodplain manager. Properties built before that date and not improved since are known as “pre-FIRM.”

Many of the pre-FIRM properties in high-risk areas do not meet current standards for construction and elevation, and they have been receiving subsidized rates that do not reflect their actual risk. The subsidized rates are being eliminated in some cases, as noted in the chart below. Some current policyholders and all future policyholders owning pre-FIRM properties in high-risk areas will pay rates based on their full risk of flood damage. However, most NFIP-insured properties (80 percent or more) are not affected by the changes.

 

How Properties and Policies are affected by subsidy changes

 

For These Pre-FIRM Properties With Newly Issued Policies Subsidized Rates Are Eliminated
Recently purchased pre-FIRM buildings in high-risk areas Policies for newly purchased pre-FIRM buildings are issued at full-risk rates. Policies that were issued at subsidized rates for pre-FIRM buildings purchased on or after 7/6/2012 renew at full-risk rates starting 10/1/2013.
Policies issued for the first time on buildings in high-risk areas New policies are issued at full-risk rates. Pre-FIRM subsidized policies first in effect on or after 7/6/2012 renew at full-risk rates starting 10/1/2013.
Policies re-issued after a lapse on pre-FIRM buildings in high-risk areas Policies are reinstated at full-risk rates. Lapsed policies reinstated on or after 10/4/2012 and before 10/1/2013 will renew at full-risk rates.

 

 

 

For These Pre-FIRM Properties Paying Subsidized Rates

 

 

Subsidized Rates Are Moving to Full-Risk Rates

 

Non-primary residences (secondary or vacation homes or rental properties) in high-risk areas

25% annual increases at policy renewal until premiums reach full-risk rates for policies in effect before 7/6/2012. If a pre-FIRM property is sold, the new owner pays full-risk rates.
Non-residential/business buildings in high-risk areas 25% annual increase at policy renewal until premiums reach full-risk rates for policies in effect before 7/6/2012. If a pre-FIRM property is sold, the new owner pays full-risk rates.
Previously flooded residences in high-risk areas  

 

25% annual increases at policy renewal for severely or repetitively flooded properties of 1 to 4 residences until premiums reach full-risk rates for policies in effect before 7/6/2012. If a pre-FIRM property is sold, the new owner pays full-risk rates.

 

For Other Property Types

 

Subsidized Rates Do Not Apply or Can Continue

Pre-FIRM primary residences in high-risk areas Subsidized rates continue when policies are in effect before 7/6/2012 until or unless:

 

  • Property is substantially improved;
  • Property of one to four residences incurs severe, repetitive losses or receives insurance payments that exceed the property’s value
  • Property is sold (the new owner pays full-risk rates); or
  • Policy is allowed to lapse.
Newer post-FIRM residences in high-risk areas Not affected; already paying full-risk rates.
Residences in moderate- to low-risk areas Not affected; properties in these areas (shown as B, C, or X zones on flood maps) do not pay subsidized rates.

 

For any questions regarding your policy feel free to give our office a call.  We are always available to answer your questions.

Source Info: http://www.floodsmart.gov

Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance

Protecting YOU is our Job

Are you prepared for a flood if it happens?

flood insurance phhIt is National Preparedness Month.  Each week we will posts tips on preparedness steps you can take incase of a disaster.  This week we are covering flooding.

Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States, however not all floods are alike.  Some floods develop slowly, while others such as flash floods can develop in just a few minutes and without visible signs of rain.  Additionally, floods can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or very large, affecting entire river basins and multiple states.

Flash floods can occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall, a dam or levee failure, or a sudden release of water held by an ice jam.  Flash floods often have a dangerous wall of roaring water carrying rocks, mud and other debris. Overland flooding, the most common type of flooding event typically occurs when waterways such as rivers or streams overflow their banks as a result of rainwater or a possible levee breach and cause flooding in surrounding areas.  It can also occur when rainfall or snowmelt exceeds the capacity of underground pipes, or the capacity of streets and drains designed to carry flood water away from urban areas.

  • Here are a few tips to prepare your family and home from a potential flood.
  • Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan
  • Avoid building in a floodplain unless you elevate and reinforce your home
  • Elevate the furnace, water heater and electric panel in your home if you live in an area that has a high flood risk
  • Consider installing “check valves” to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home
  • If feasible, construct barriers to stop floodwater from entering the building and seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds.

Things to know about Flood Insurance

  • Flood losses are not typically covered under renter and homeowner’s insurance policies
  • FEMA manages the National Flood Insurance Program
  • Flood insurance is available in most communities through your insurance agent
  • There is a 30-day waiting period before flood insurance goes into effect
  • Flood insurance is available whether the building is in or out of an identified flood-prone area.

For any questions regarding Flood Insurance give us a call today at 860-684-2721.  One of our agents will be happy to assist you.

Source info: http://www.ready.gov/floods

 

 

Flood Insurance

Flood insurance coverage is fairly new since it was generally unavailable until the federal government became involved. In 1968, Congress created the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to make flood insurance available to eligible communities through federal subsidization. What that means is that flood insurance is only available through government entities since insurance companies don’t provide coverage for it. The program is managed by the Federal Insurance Administration (FIA), which is a branch of FEMA.

There are two types of flood insurance programs available: emergency and regular. The emergency program goes into effect when the community applies to the NFIP and remains in effect until the government finalizes the flood insurance rates for that community. Under emergency program, insured may purchase limited amounts of flood insurance for buildings and contents at subsidized rates. Under regular program, additional coverage may be purchased that wouldn’t be allowed under emergency program.

The following scenarios are covered under flood insurance.

1. An overflow of inland or tidal waters

2. Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface water from any source, unless general flooding exists.

3. Mudslides caused by accumulations of water on the ground or underground.

4. Collapse of land as a result of excessive erosion due to flood.

(Sewer backup into a dwelling is not covered.)

Almost any building that is walled and roofed, is principally above ground, and is fixed to a permanent site is eligible for coverage under a flood policy. The policy may cover a building, its contents, or both. Coverage does not take effect until after a waiting period of 30 days following the date of application.

If you have any questions about flood insurance or would like to know more about it, give us a call at 860 684 2721 or visit our website for more information.