Category Archives: Road Dangers

Fatigue leading cause of motor vehicle accidents

fatigue drivingWith the Holidays approaching we all will be hitting the road to visit our families.  For many of us the travel is a long one. Those long drives can lead to fatigue. According to research fatigue is a significant factor in motor vehicle, commercial trucking and rail collisions.

 

 

  • Drowsy driving causes more than 100,000 motor vehicle crashes a year, resulting in 40,000 injuries and 1,550 deaths, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration research.
  • An AAA Traffic Safety Foundation survey found that one in four drivers have struggled to stay awake by driving. An estimated 17 percent of fatal crashes, 13 percent of crashes resulting in hospitalization and 7 percent of all crashes requiring a tow, involve a drowsy driver, according to a 2010 study by the AAA.
  • Driver-related factors such as fatigue were recorded for 34 percent of the drivers of large trucks in fatal collisions in 2010 according to the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
  • Speeding was the top driver-related factor in crashes involving large trucks, followed by distraction/inattention, impairment (fatigue, alcohol, illness, etc.), failure to keep in proper lane and vision obscured, according to the DOT.
  • A 2013 study by the Federal Rail Administration found that fatigue greatly increases the chances of an accident in which human factors play a role, with the risk of such an accident rising from11 percent to 65 percent.

So when traveling this Holiday season be certain to take several breaks during your long travel.  Get out of the car, stretch and walk around. A 10 minute break could help you stay awake and prevent a potential accident due to fatigue. Getting to your destination is important, but getting their safely is more important.

Be safe in your Holiday Travels.

Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance

Protecting YOU is our Job

Source: iii.org

Fines for not removing snow and ice from a motor vehicle

remove ice and snow lawWe’ve all seen it happen.  You’re driving down the highway and up ahead is a vehicle whose roof is piled high with snow.  Within minutes the snow is flying of their roof and headed in your direction.  You switch lanes to avoid it hitting your windshield.  SNOW & ICE-it’s part of living in New England.  We need to be more careful about making sure our vehicles are clear of snow and ice, as not to potentially cause damage to other vehicles while driving.

As of October 1st, 2013 the Senate and House of Representatives passed a new law concerning just this. Below is the new law in effective, so that you are informed.

AN ACT CONCERNING THE PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REMOVE ICE OR SNOW FROM A MOTOR VEHICLE

(a) The operator of any noncommercial motor vehicle, as defined in section 14-1, shall remove any accumulated ice or snow from such motor vehicle, including the hood, trunk and roof of such motor vehicle, so that any ice or snow accumulated on such vehicle does not pose a threat to persons or property while the vehicle is being operated on any street or highway of this state. Any such operator who fails to remove accumulated ice or snow that poses such a threat shall be fined seventy-five dollars and shall be deemed to have committed an infraction.

(b) If the operator of a noncommercial motor vehicle violates the provisions of subsection (a) of this section and snow or ice is dislodged from such vehicle and causes personal injury or property damage, such operator shall be fined not less than two hundred dollars but not more than one thousand dollars for each offense.

(c) On and after December 31, 2013, the operator of any commercial motor vehicle, as defined in section 14-1, shall remove any accumulated ice or snow from such motor vehicle, including the hood, trunk and roof of such motor vehicle, so that any ice or snow accumulated on such vehicle does not pose a threat to persons or property while the vehicle is being operated on any street or highway of this state. Any such operator who fails to remove accumulated ice or snow that poses such a threat shall be fined seventy-five dollars and shall be deemed to have committed an infraction.

(d) On and after December 31, 2013, if the operator of a commercial motor vehicle violates the provisions of subsection (c) of this section and snow or ice is dislodged from such vehicle and causes personal injury or property damage, such operator shall be fined not less than five hundred dollars but not more than twelve hundred fifty dollars for each offense.

(e) This section shall not apply to (1) any operator of a motor vehicle during a period of snow, sleet or freezing rain if such period began and continued during the period of the motor vehicle’s operation, or (2) any operator of a motor vehicle during the time such vehicle is parked.

Approved June 6, 2013

Keep this in mind as winter is just around the corner.  Avoid getting fined, keep your car free of snow and ice.

Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance

Protecting YOU is our Job

The Fall Season brings with it road dangers

deer-vehicle collisionsWe may not stop think of the road dangers that can occur in the Fall Season.  With September to December being deer migration and mating season, this increases the movement of the deer population. As a result more deer-vehicle collision occur during this period.

According to the Insurance Information Institute an estimated 1.22 million deer-vehicle collisions occurred in the U.S. between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, a 3.5 percent decrease from a year ago. However the average insurance claim for this type of collision in the same time period was $3,414, up 3.3 percent from the previous year with costs varying depending on the type of vehicle and severity of the damage.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) noted that deer-vehicle collisions in the U.S. cause about 200 fatalities annually. Furthermore, in a recent study of fatal animal crashes, IIHS reported that 60 percent of people killed were not wearing a seatbelt.

Be Aware

  • Deer are not just found on rural roads near wooded areas; many deer crashes occur on busy highways near cities.
  • Deer are unpredictable, especially when faced with glaring headlights, blowing horns and fast-moving vehicles. They often dart into traffic.
  • Deer often move in groups. If you see one, there are likely to be more in the vicinity.

Take Precautions

  • Drive with care when moving through deer-crossing zones, in areas known to have a large deer population and in areas where roads divide agricultural fields from forestland.
  • Always wear your seatbelt.
  • When driving at night, use high beam headlights when there is no oncoming traffic. The high beams will better illuminate the eyes of any deer on or near the roadway.
  • Be especially attentive from sunset to midnight and during the hours shortly before or after sunrise. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions.
  • Brake firmly when you notice a deer in or near your path, but stay in your lane. Many serious crashes occur when drivers swerve to avoid a deer and hit another vehicle or lose control of their cars.
  • Do not rely on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences and reflectors to deter deer. These devices have not proven effective.

Damage caused by an accident with deer or other animals is typically covered under the optional comprehensive portion of an automobile insurance policy.

Penny Hanley & Howley Insurance

Protecting YOU is our Job

source: III.org